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"To drink" in Kurdish

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Hesen
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Kurmanjí: vexwarin, from: ve+xwarin < Middle Persian: ebaz < Avesta: apish
Soraní: 1. ewexwardin, from: ewe+xwardin, 2. noshín = which rot has it?
Zazakí: shimitene, from Avesta steme: sham-
Southern Kurdish: ?, Hewramí: ?

DRoshani
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Núshín,

There are words in old Gúraní such as Núshín, awnúsh, but in Persian it has become Núshíden. So I am not sure why this word is not on your list.

I believe the word Ashamíden in Persian is a combine word of Aw/Ab+shamíden (sham).

It is good to now that in south Kurdish the word for watermelon is Shamí

Shamí Harúnawa júri sheker shírírn e.

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zimanzan
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"núshín"/"noshín"

Yes, also Central Kirmanjí "noshín". I am not sure about their etymology right now.

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Hesen
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-shim-

I think, "shim" is the oldest steme for "drink" in Kurdish (in Persian under "ashamiden" represented) and Kurmanji forgot this and replaced it with a verb-combination of "eat".

The Past Tense marker "it" or "id" will be in Kurmanjí to "í", in Zazaki to "a", example:

Many Northern Zazaki dialects: zanit = has knowed
Changed in the most Zazaki-Dialects to: zana
In Kurmanji to: zaní

So the most optimal variant of this verb were in a Standard Kurdish with Kurmanji basis:

shimín = to drink, ez dishimim = I drink

zimanzan
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"shimiten"/"heshavitin"

Well I got to say that ain’t right, regarding to Kirmanjí leaving a supposable "shimín" and picking up "vexwarin"/"xwardinewe" in exchange.
If I am not wrong the Old Iranian verb "hver-" could convey both senses of "to eat" as well as "to drink". Nowadays, apparently, most Iranian languages no matter from which branch, represent their relevant cognates of this ancient verb in both senses of "to eat" and "to drink". And probably with prefixes to distinguish: haxérdén, axúrdin, vexwarin, etc. It includes colloquial Persian too. However in the official Persian another verb exists: ashamíden. Persian "ashamíden" along with Zaza "shimiten" are of Parthian origin: eb-shamad-. This "eb-" is a famous Parthian prefix and evidently its original use is restricted to Parthian only since no other modern Iranian language inherently contains it. Parthian "ebshamad-" shows up within Middle Iranian texts for the first time. This new Parthian coined verb is also borrowed by some Northern Kirmanjí sub-dialects since we can find "heshavitin" (< eshamit-*). A Proto-Kurdish form of this loan-verb that we could reconstruct would be: "eshamit-*". There is a phenomenon which mainly takes place in Zaza: dropping initial "e-". I am gonna exemplify this tendency thru its respective topic. Most likely the Zaza verb has passed this relatively long path: shimit- < shemit-* < eshemit-* < eshamit-*.

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Hesen
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Why should "shimitene" a

Why should "shimitene" a loanword, if also languages like Avesta did used it too. Is also "roj" a loanword from Persian "rôz"? Where are the evidences?

zimanzan
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Ashim- / Shim-

It sounds impossible to take that Zaza "shim-" is a direct cognate of Avestan "shem-" since all other Iranian languages, whether Middle or Modern, that contain this verb represent it with an extra prefix, most likely derived from Parthian "ebsham-": Persian "asham-", Kirmanjí "heshav-". It's worthy of mention that according to Ferhengí Hejhír, under the Kurdish counterparts for Persian "ashamíden", there is Hewramí "ashim-". It's not surprising to speculate a Proto Kurdish "esham-" (of Parthian origin) that later gives Kirmanjí "heshav-" and Pehlewaní "ashim-"/"eshim-", which drops the initial "e-" (as a frequent phenomenon) and becomes "shim-" in Zaza. Here it is:

Avestan: shem-

Parthian: ebsham-

Persian: asham-

Kirmanjí: heshav-

Pehlewaní: ashim-, shim-

Honestly I cannot get ride of the vacillation and accept it that out of the above examples only Zaza "shim-" has escaped the Parthian influence, while Hewramí "ashim-" is for sure a derivation of Parthian "ebsham-" ( > or under Persian influence: "asham-"), and the fact that Zaza frequently drops initial "e-".

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Hesen
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Then for a Standard Kurdish

Then for a Standard Kurdish we can pick out this variants:

1. vehwerdin (ez vedehwem)
2. noshín (ez denoshim)
3. eshavitin* (ez deshavim)

All three variants ca be use in the most original vowels. I think the "o" in "noshín" is older, because Southern Kurdish changes many Middle Iranian /ó/-louds which were in Old Iranian /o/ into /ú/.

* we can let the /h/ at the begin, its secundary and unncessary as in "hésin" and "hesp", which standards are "asin" and "esp". It's in Hewramí without /h/ too ("ashim-"), so it were not artifical.

PS: According to Paul it was in Avesta with long /á/ too, if you give me your Yahoo or MSN-account, i can send you the PDF's of Paul Horn.