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Dayik - the roots of the word "Mother"?

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Rawaz_S
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A few years ago a Persian frend of mine asked me what "mother" is called in Kurdish. Naturally my reply was "Dayik".
Then he said something that puzzled me a bit: "Kurdish must be the only [Indo-European] language which does not use something like mother, mader, mama etc."

I don't know if this is true but it does at least at a first glance seem like Kurdish stands out a bit on this particular word. Could it be a remnant from Caucasian language or where does it come from?

zimanzan
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Dayik

Kirmanjí Kurdish contains a body of common words for "mother"; that, as my memory helps, as follow:

Northern Kirmanjí: da, daye, díya, dé, dayik, dayík

Central Kirmanjí: dayik, dayk, daye

Southern Kirmanjí: dallig, dayg, dayig

They all share a common Proto-Kurdish root "da-" which, as Kak Hesen mentioned, is derived from an Ancient root that is represented in Avesta as "da-" (I use Unified Kurdish letters for Romanizing Avestan words). It, "da-", later receives "-y" in various tenses as a result of the finale "-a" vowel: "da(y)-". This Avestan verbal root means "to care, to watch". Also a cognate of Kurdish "dayik" serves in another meaning in Persian: "dayé" ~ "nursemaid". Seemingly Kirmanjí Kurdish has chosen an exclusive way to define the significance of "mother", while other Iranian languages mostly preserved the Proto-Indo-European root: mat, mader, mar, ma.

Bakhtyari and Luri contain "dayé" for "mother" too, which should be observed within the compass of Kurdish lexical influence on those two speeches.

However "dayik" and its cognates serve in a larg extent in Kirmanjí, but the common Indo-European root for "mother" still lives on: "mak". This word in several Central Kirmanjí subdialects is used instead of "dayik". Also it receives a general usage in the famous words like "zikmakí" and "wirgmakí" ~ "innate, inborn". This, "mak", is combined of "ma" and "-k". The second one is a very renowned Kurdish suffix from Old Iranian "-eke", and the first one is derived from earliest Iranian form "matere" (since Kurdish speeches mainly drop "-ere" from the familial nouns: bira < biratere*, píya < pítere*, ma < matere, xweh < hvehre). According to Zaza "ma" (the final "-y-e" in "maye" is the dialectal feminine marker) and Kirmanjí "mak", the Proto Kurdish cognate of English "mother" would be "ma".

By the way the Kurdish word for "nursemaid" is "dayan".

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Hesen
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Here are valuable
Hesen
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We Zazas use "maye" for

We Zazas use "maye" for "mother" (the -ye ending is a feminine suffix), in Izafe:

maya mi = my mother

But, if we call to the mother in vocatife, we use: dayê!

The "-ik" in "dayik" is only a diminutive suffix as in many other words.

According to Mirzali Zazaoglu the steme "da" comes from Avesta: dā- which means "to nurse" and in Avesta was "daēnu-" like "mother, the person who nurses".

"mader" and "maye" come from Avesta/OP-form "mater" which will be in Pahlavi "mader".